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Reading the Gospels wisely : a narrative and theological introduction Jonathan T. Pennington.

By: Pennington, Jonathan TMaterial type: TextTextLanguage: English Publication details: Grand Rapids, MI : Baker Academic, 2012Description: xiv, 268 tr. : ill. ; 23 cmISBN: 9780801039379 (pbk.); 0801039371 (pbk.)Subject(s): Bible. Gospels -- Criticism, interpretation, etc | Bible. N.T. Gospels -- TheologyDDC classification: 226.06 LOC classification: BS2555.52 | .P455 2012
Contents:
What are the Gospels? defining "Gospel" -- What are the Gospels? understanding the "Gospel" genre -- Why do we need the Gospels? (or why Saint Paul is not enough) -- The joy and angst of having four Gospels -- Texts and history: the testimony of the fourfold witness -- Reading Holy Scripture well: three avenues -- Reading Holy Scripture well: intent, meaning, and posture -- Foundations for reading the Gospels well -- Reading the Gospels as stories: the "whatever strikes me" (WSM) hermeneutic versus narrative analysis -- Reading the Gospels as stories: circles of contextual meaning -- Summing it all up: applying and teaching the Gospels -- The Gospels as the archway of the canon.
Summary: In this work, Jonathan Pennington examines the theological and ethical aims of the Gospel narratives, helping students see the fruit of historical and literary study. He contends that we can learn to read the Gospels well from various vantage points, including those of premodern, modern, and postmodern habits and postures. This textbook can stand on its own as a guide to reading the Gospels as Scripture. It is also ideally suited to supplement conventional textbooks that discuss each Gospel systematically. Most textbooks tend to introduce students to historical-critical concerns but may be less adequate for showing how the Gospel narratives, read as Scripture within the canonical framework of the entire New Testament and the whole Bible, yield material for theological reflection and faithful practice. Pennington neither dismisses nor duplicates the results of current historical-critical work on the Gospels as historical sources. Rather, he offers critically aware and hermeneutically intelligent instruction in reading the Gospels in order to hear their witness to Christ in a way that supports Christian application and proclamation. This text will appeal to professors and students in Gospels, New Testament survey, and New Testament interpretation courses. - Publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: Phương Pháp Học Kinh Thánh | Bible Study Methods
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General Stacks
Non-fiction 226.06 P3841 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 10353

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

What are the Gospels? defining "Gospel" -- What are the Gospels? understanding the "Gospel" genre -- Why do we need the Gospels? (or why Saint Paul is not enough) -- The joy and angst of having four Gospels -- Texts and history: the testimony of the fourfold witness -- Reading Holy Scripture well: three avenues -- Reading Holy Scripture well: intent, meaning, and posture -- Foundations for reading the Gospels well -- Reading the Gospels as stories: the "whatever strikes me" (WSM) hermeneutic versus narrative analysis -- Reading the Gospels as stories: circles of contextual meaning -- Summing it all up: applying and teaching the Gospels -- The Gospels as the archway of the canon.

In this work, Jonathan Pennington examines the theological and ethical aims of the Gospel narratives, helping students see the fruit of historical and literary study. He contends that we can learn to read the Gospels well from various vantage points, including those of premodern, modern, and postmodern habits and postures. This textbook can stand on its own as a guide to reading the Gospels as Scripture. It is also ideally suited to supplement conventional textbooks that discuss each Gospel systematically. Most textbooks tend to introduce students to historical-critical concerns but may be less adequate for showing how the Gospel narratives, read as Scripture within the canonical framework of the entire New Testament and the whole Bible, yield material for theological reflection and faithful practice. Pennington neither dismisses nor duplicates the results of current historical-critical work on the Gospels as historical sources. Rather, he offers critically aware and hermeneutically intelligent instruction in reading the Gospels in order to hear their witness to Christ in a way that supports Christian application and proclamation. This text will appeal to professors and students in Gospels, New Testament survey, and New Testament interpretation courses. - Publisher.

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